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Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of Parasite records for the Douglas-fir tussock moth found in the catalog.

Parasite records for the Douglas-fir tussock moth

Torolf R. Torgersen

Parasite records for the Douglas-fir tussock moth

by Torolf R. Torgersen

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station in [Portland, Or.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas-fir tussock moth,
  • Douglas fir -- Diseases and pests

  • Edition Notes

    StatementTorolf R. Torgersen.
    SeriesGeneral technical report PNW -- 123.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination38 p. ;
    Number of Pages38
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17613873M
    OCLC/WorldCa7921433

    Douglas-fir Tussock Moth The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is an important defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region. Feeding by the larvae can cause complete defoliation of heavily infested trees. Adult Douglas-fir tussock moth male. He is a dull, brown-gray, ordinary looking moth. Table 1. Total Volume Decline l of Tree Mortality with [no treatment) Natural Degree of defoliation Estimate Class 1, Intensive Class II, Moderate Class III, Light Class IV, None OSU low1 Percent 84 84 Percent 16 19 34 Percent 0 Percent 0.

    Douglas-fir tussock moth mature larva (caterpillar) The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native insect. in the low-lying, dry belt Douglas-fir regions of southern British Columbia. It is not an introduced species. It feeds primarily on Douglas-fir, and occasionally on ponderosa pine and western larch. Ornamental spruce. Douglas-fircan cause problems because the larval hairs tussockMovement of Douglas-fir tussock moth into moth during outbreaks. ©Colorado State University Extension. 3/ Revised 7/ Caterpillars of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), chew the needles of spruces, Douglas fir and true firs.

    Black-tusked tussock moth caterpillars are munching fir trees along Colorado’s Front Range, spreading acr acres, forcing a $, urban . Identification of parasites of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, based on adults, cocoons, and puparia / View Metadata By: Torgersen, Torolf R. - Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.).


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Parasite records for the Douglas-fir tussock moth by Torolf R. Torgersen Download PDF EPUB FB2

Parasite records for the Douglas-fir tussock moth (General technical report PNW) [Torolf R Torgersen] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Torolf R Torgersen. Parasite records for the Douglas-fir tussock moth. [Portland, Or.]: U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station,   Identification of parasites of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, based on adults, cocoons, and puparia Item Preview Full catalog record MARCXML.

This book is available with additional data at Biodiversity Heritage Library. Parasite records for the Douglas-fir tussock moth / By Torolf R. Torgersen. Abstract. Douglas fir, Douglas-fir tussock moth, Douglas-fir tussock moth Author: Torolf R.

Torgersen. Identification of parasites of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, based on adults, cocoons, and puparia.

Portland, Or.: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, ASP II ^4/Zfc PARASITISM OF DGUGLAS-FIR TUSSOCK Mfyru I lyj. n (_ J‘JO IN DENVER Forest Insect and Disease Management State and Private Forestry Rocky Mountain Region USDa, r orest Service lli/7 Wp 8th Avenue Lakewood, Colorado b 7 Up is PARASITISM OF DOUGLAS-FIR TUSSOCK MOTH EGGS IN DENVER — ^ by Robert D.

Averi11. Douglas-fir is the preferred host, but pine, arborvitae, spruce, and true firs also are attacked. Biology and life history Larvae hibernate in dense clusters on. Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Orgyia pseudotsugata Key Wildlife Value: The Douglas-fir tussock moth creates snags and down wood by severely defoliating and causing the death of all sizes of true fir and Douglas-fir trees.

It also interacts with other disturbance agents, especially bark beetles, to cause host tree mortality. Orgyia pseudotsugata (Douglas-fir tussock moth) is a moth of the subfamily Lymantriinae found in western North America. Its population periodically irrupts in cyclical caterpillars feed on the needles of Douglas fir, true fir, and spruce in summer, and moths are on the wing from July or August to : Insecta.

The Lymantriinae (formerly called the Lymantriidae) are a subfamily of moths of the family Erebidae. Many of its component species are referred to as "tussock moths" of one sort or another. The caterpillar, or larval, stage of these species often has a distinctive appearance of alternating bristles and haired : Insecta.

Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a native defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and true firs (Abies spp.), though will rarely feed on planted Colorado blue spruce in urban moth is a native species found throughout mixed-conifer forests in the western United States and southern British Columbia.

Parasite records for the Douglas-fir tussock moth / ([Portland, Or.]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, ), by Torolf R. Torgersen (page images at HathiTrust) Douglas-fir tussock moth. Parasite records for the Douglas-fir tussock moth.

USDA For. Sew. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW, 38 p. Pac. Northwest For. and Range Exp. Stn., Portland, Oreg. This is an annotated assemblage of parasite and hyperparasite records for the Douglas-fir tussock moth.

Species in more than 50 genera in the Hymenoptera and Diptera are included. The Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is an important defoliator of true firs and Douglas-fir in Western North America.

Severe tussock moth outbreaks have occurred in British Columbia, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, California, Arizona, and New Mexico, but the moth causes notable damage in a much geographic area.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native insect in the low-lying, dry belt Douglas-fir regions of southern British Columbia. It is not an introduced species.

It feeds primarily on Douglas-fir, and occasionally on ponderosa pine and western larch. Ornamental spruce and pine may also be affected in urban. Outbreaks of tussock moth occur every ten to twelve years causing significant damage and mortality to Douglas-fir stands in the interior of the province.

These outbreaks tend to last up to four years before natural controls such as predators, parasites, pathogens, and starvation lead to population collapse. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a common and periodically destructive solitary defoliator.

Occasionally, localized outbreaks occur on individual or small groups of Douglas-fir or spruce in urban settings both on the coast and in the interior. Severe defoliation by the tussock moth may result in tree mortality, top-kill or weakened trees, making. A study in insect parasitism; a consideration of the parasites of the white-marked tussock moth, with an account of their habits and interrelations, and with descriptions of new species [Leland Ossian Howard] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book. Page 4 – Douglas-fir tussock moth January Figure 6. Douglas-fir tussock moth cocoon.

Photo: Glenn Kohler, Washington DNR. Signs and symptoms to look for. DFTM egg masses can be found on the underside of branches and on structures through the winter. Egg masses are about one inch across, round, grey, hairy, with white eggs (Fig. Mature. Douglas-fir, white fir, and grand fir are all equally acceptable.

In the south (California, Nevada, Arizona, and Figure 1. -- Distrubution of host type where Douglas-fir tussock moth may be found and location of outbreaks. trees, brush, and buildings, but once an outbreak subsides, finding caterpil-lars is difficult. Defoliation by the tussock moth. The Douglas-fir tussock moth management system.

() AH Rating the risk of tussock moth defoliation using aerial photographs. () AH U.S. inspected meat and poultry packing plants: a guide to construction and layout. () AHThe biology, natural enemy complex and population dynamics of Orgyia pseudotsugata, an important defoliator of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and true firs (Abies spp.) in western North America, are reviewed and the possibilities of introducing natural enemies of related species from Europe for its biological control in Canada are by: 3.Parasite records for the Douglas-fir tussock moth / ([Portland, Or.]: U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, ), by Torolf R. Torgersen (page images at HathiTrust).